Saturday, November 25, 2017

1939 Ford 9N Repair Work: Fuel, Air, and Oil

Continuing my Ford 9N repair series, this week covers the air, fuel, and oil systems.  If you've got no idea what I'm talking about, start with the overview post.  I own a 75 year old tractor that's not been particularly well maintained for the past decade or so, and I'm fixing the problems with it.  This is something totally and completely unlike small electronics or cell phones, but it's properly enjoyable to work on!


The air cleaner was dirty, the exhaust manifold was shot, the carburetor wasn't much better, and the whole thing needed some oil changes.  So, of course, I fixed all that stuff!

Saturday, November 18, 2017

1939 Ford 9N Repair Work: Electrical

This week, I'm talking about electrical system work on my tractor.  If you have no idea what I'm working on, I've got a 1939 Ford 9N tractor that I bought needing a good bit of work, and this series of 4 posts is documenting the repair process.


Last winter, I knew the electrical system was in rough shape.  The generator didn't work, the battery was pretty bad, and the one of the plug wires ends was rusted through and worked by being wedged in place by the spark plug so it could arc to the plug.  On top of that, there's some general wisdom about old Ford N series tractors that applies - the ignition switch is probably shot and high resistance, and the connections need some love.  So, this week, I talk about fixing all that stuff.  Read on for the details!

Saturday, November 11, 2017

1939 Ford 9N Repair Work: History and Teardown

This week is the first of a series of posts on my 1939 Ford 9N - a small utility tractor I use for property work and, importantly, snow removal in the winter.  This tractor has a bit of history in the family, but hasn't been well maintained to "winter plowing" standards - and definitely hasn't been maintained to my preferred standards.  It's been more "Fix it when it breaks" instead of getting it into good shape and keeping it there - which was fine for the occasional light summer and fall use, but not with what I'm using it for now.


If you're used to modern, disposable things (which, let's be honest, is most of the stuff built today), old tractors are entirely different.  They're built to run forever with occasional rebuilds, done mostly by a farmer with a crescent wrench.  My tractor is 75 years old now, and I fully expect it to outlive me.  It's a different kind of device, and I'll try to explain it as I go, for those not familiar with oil bath cleaners, carburetors, sediment bowls, and the like - so keep on reading!  If something isn't clear, please let me know in the comments and I'll try to explain better.

Saturday, November 4, 2017

Harbor Freight Wind Up Flashlight/Radio Teardown, Review, and Upgrade (Model 98319)

I've torn down plenty of little solar powered gizmos on this blog, but I haven't torn down a crank powered gizmo - until now!  I had some spare birthday money and was at Harbor Freight.  Harbor Freight is a bad idea, generally speaking, because I end up with some neat (and cheap) gizmos to pull apart.

Like this one!  This is an "Emergency Crank Radio/Flashlight."  Well, I've had crank flashlights before, but I've never ripped one apart to see what makes it tick!


What's inside?  How does it work?  How can I improve it?  Is this worth buying?  What are the power consumption numbers?  Read on for the answers to all these questions!