Saturday, September 30, 2017

Driving a 1927 Willys Knight

Oh, my, my, my.  It's been one of those weeks again.  I've found myself traveling through yet another series of time vortexes, and have found myself quite in the future, in "2017."  Which, obviously, is nonsense, as the world is clearly going to end in the year 2000, when the mechanical computing devices cannot understand the year change, as the number of gears and cogs required to store a 4 digit year "cost too much," or so say the clueless carrot counters in charge of driving the engineers to cut every single non-essential component in our sophisticated computational machines.

But, time vortexes being as they are, I did find myself in what, for all the world, appeared to be some time past the year 2000, when mechanical computational devices have been replaced, almost entirely, with "transistors" and "microchips."  How these replace a proper computer consisting of cogs and cams is beyond me, but, suffice it to say, they appear to have succeeded.  Admirably.  Everything has these "transistors" in it.  Even radios!

And, again, I go on about irrelevant things.  My purpose in posting today, in the time I find myself, is to offer some advice to those who may find themselves driving "antique cars" of the Willys-Overland brand, focusing on their superior Knight - my vehicle of choice, of course, with the silent sleeve valves instead of those clattering, tapping, and generally irritating and always out of adjustment poppet valves used in inferior engines.

Fortunately, I stumbled across a group driving what, to them, were "antique cars."  And I was able to join right in and have a grand time exploring southwest Idaho with them!  Though, sadly, one of them had a 1926 Knight, before they added the rectifier - and he did, in fact, smoke like a Knight without a rectifier!


But, if you, as a modern operator of such a vehicle, desire some advice - read on!

Saturday, September 23, 2017

DJI Mavic Pro: The Missing Handbook: QuickShot Modes and Dynamic Home Point

If you keep up with the Mavic Pro firmware changelog, you may have noticed that v1.04.0000 adds a pair of new features - QuickShot and Dynamic Home Point.  These are new to the Mavic Pro, so I decided to give them my usual treatment!

QuickShot adds a few more automatic flight modes for taking videos - Dronie, Rocket, and Helix.  And Dynamic Home Point resolves a somewhat annoying issue for longer distance Active Track work related to "Where the drone thinks home is" versus "Where it's reasonable for the drone to think home is."


So, if you have a Mavic Pro (or are just interested in the new capabilities), read on!